Calcium on Apples

Why is calcium important?

Calcium is the third most important element in a plant. And, calcium is the fifth most abundant element on the planet. It makes sense that traditionally, growers don’t apply much calcium, because they assume the plant will get what they need from the soil. But, calcium is usually found in a form that is not easily taken up by plants.

In an apple tree, the leaves, new shoots, and fruit all take calcium and the nutrient will be found in the tissues and the root, but, the fruit cannot compete with the other parts of the plant hence why the fruit often doesn’t get enough calcium. That is why calcium deficiencies are evidenced on the fruit, rather than the rest of the tree. In apples, a calcium deficiency causes a disorder known as bitter pit. Bitter pit is a physiological breakdown of the cell walls in the fruit that occur below the skin of the fruit. For that reason, when scouting for calcium deficiencies, it is important to test the fruit, rather than relying solely on leaf or soil tests.BMSB.-Bitter-Pit-1h84hub

In this particular trial, Horticulturists were testing for fruit firmness, how many apples produced on each tree, and how much the fruit weighs. At the North Central Research Station High-Density Apple Orchard, researchers test approximately 10 apples per experimental plot for firmness. They use a pentameter, which measures the pressure needed to break the cell part inside the apple. They test four spots on each apple, as research has shown there is a difference in firmness between the side of the apple exposed to sun, versus the shade-side. The average fruit firmness is reported.

A trial of the effects of LiberateCa™ in 2015 at the NCRS High-density Apple Orchard in Michigan showed that the apples treated with LiberateCa™ fall close to the preferred range of 14.5 lb – 17.5 lb for fruit firmness, while the untreated trees’ fruit firmness was significantly higher than desired. In addition, the treated trees had more apples per tree, and overall yield per tree increased as well. These trees were planted at 3 ½ feet between trees, 11 feet between rows, with a planting density of 1,100 trees per acre.Ca on apples

“If you can hang two more apples per tree, with 1,100 trees, you have 2,200 more apples – and that means more money in your pocket.” Horticulturist Jacob Emling

Fertilizer Program Sustainability in Corn 2011-2015

Senior Research Manager, Dr. Jerry Wilhm discusses how and why the lower applied rates of AgroLiquid nutrients are sustainable and more efficient in feeding the plant the nutrients it needs to thrive. In this short video, Dr. Wilhm further demonstrates this through a four-year sustainability study from the North Central Research Station (NCRS).

Download a pdf version of Fertilizer Sustainability in Corn

Research Field Days 2015

Soil Fertility and Success

An important part of evaluating your fertility program is to identify existing problems or limiting factors that are restricting yields and make plans to correct them. An annual review is essential. What worked one year might not work the next year. Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers can subscribe a growing program that is right for your farm.

Soil Testing

Maintaining a healthy balanced soil requires consistent effort and advanced planning. This is the best way to determine how much nutrition is available to feed your crops from planting to harvest. Create a custom fertility program that pushes your yield to the max. Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers has a variety of products to help you maintain a healthy balanced soil.

AgroLiquid Recognizes Ovid Elsie FFA

As an FFA Foundation Member, Troy Bancroft speaks about his passion for supporting FFA and the future agriculture industry. Recently the Headquarters of AgroLiquid had a public open house and the Ovid Elsie FFA Chapter of Michigan helped assist at this large event. To show his gratitude Troy awards them for their help.

CA Part 8

Part 8:

To prepare for the layoffs many food lines have been set up and are prepared to stay running during the winter. The Endangered Species Act will cause collateral damage. For every $1 spent on the farmer approximately $7 is spent in town. These effects will hurt not only workers, but the government and schools as well.

Listen for the last section of the series.

Getting More For Less

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Getting More For Less From The Fertilizer You Apply

No-tillers can’t afford to waste money on applied fertilizer. Neither can the agriculture industry continue to watch these resources negatively impact watersheds without expecting possible severe regulations. Nobody knows that any better than no-tiller Mike Starkey of Brownsburg, Ind., whose farm lies right at the base of the Eagle Creek Watershed that supplies the city of Indianapolis its drinking water.
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Join Mike Starkey on Tuesday, November 26, at 7 p.m. Central time (8 p.m. Eastern) as he reviews what he’s learned from onfarm trials and the changes he’s made to his fertility-management practices throughout the years. You’ll learn how he’s been able to increase corn and soybean yields with less applied fertilizer and reduce his impact on the environment. This No-Till Farmer webinar is being made possible with support from Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers.

Here are some of the things that Starkey will address in this exclusive webinar.

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  • Recent onfarm strip trial results that compare the performance of different types of applied fertilizer, including 10-34-0, 28%, liquid fertilizers and/or thiosulfate.
  • Changes that Starkey has made to his applied fertilizer program in the past decade, including a thorough look at timing of application, placement and rates.
  • The impact of cover-cropping systems on his applied nitrogen rates.

Sign up for the FREE webinar!

Our 5-year No-Till Operational Benchmark Study reveals that applied fertilizer consistently ranks as one of the most costly inputs for no-tillers. Check in with No-Till Farmer, Mike Starkey and Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers on Tuesday, November 26, at 7 p.m. Central time (8 p.m. Eastern) to get a better understanding of managing fertility for efficacy and efficiency.

CA Part 7

Part 7:

The Endangered Species Act doe not just affect the farmers, but is a threat to the economy too. There is potential for widespread layoffs. America could be at risk as California produces majority of the nuts, fruits and vegetables in the nation. This impact goes further than the valley.

Listen for Part 7 of the series.

CA Part 6

Part 6:

The California water shortage has been a problem since 2009 and has only been getting worse. There is great uncertainty in the future. Many do not see the need for balance with the water restriction laws. People need to realize farmers are environmentalists too. 

Listen for Part 6 of the series.